Jason Boyd Kinsella
Jason Boyd Kinsella

Jason Boyd Kinsella

'The work is a mix of the beautiful and grotesque, the delicate and dark.'
 
Jason Boyd Kinsella's work is concerned with the constituent parts of the human condition.

 

This brand of hyper-contemporary psychological portraiture aims to deconstruct the personality traits of the sitter, using geometric shapes as building blocks to convey the complexity of human emotion, and bridge the gap between our internal feelings and external appearance. Jason is exploring the visceral elements of our mental landscape, the whole canopy of internal experience seeps through us, in our image and actions; Jason wishes to capture this in a way that nods to our increasingly close connections to digital versions of ourselves.

 
Like so many artists, Jason's artistic journey is one rooted in pencil and paper.

 

The appreciation of line and form that drawing instills in the artist remains a key factor of Jason's practice. He spends every morning sketching and, when a certain work stands out, he transfers that sketch to a computer. Here, the previously tentative marks of the sketch become the firm boundaries of digitally rendered shapes; colour is then added and manipulated, shapes are repositioned and reorientated until the essence of the figure Jason wishes to capture is faithfully represented. He then works from this reference using oil paints on canvas, reinstating the crucial human component that's considered tantamount to the artistic process.  The results are large-scale, beautiful portraits that are both conceptually enticing and technically accomplished.

 

Jason Boyd Kinsella in his studio 2020

Jason was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969.

He studied for a BFA at Bishop's University in Quebec and now splits his time between Oslo and Los Angeles. His first solo exhibition with Unit London will take place in June 2021, in which he will expand on his body of painting while experimenting with elements of augmented reality and 3D printing.  

 

'A portrait can be unsettling to the person I have portrayed, because it puts on display the vulnerable pieces that...
'A portrait can be unsettling to the person I have portrayed, because it puts on display the vulnerable pieces that...

"A portrait can be unsettling to the person I have portrayed, because it puts on display the vulnerable pieces that they try to hide."

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